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Alsace Wine

Alsace Wine

The Beyer family have had vine-holdings around the immaculately preserved medieval village of Eguisheim since the 16th century and are widely-regarded as being amongst the very best producers in the region. Today they own 23 hectares of vines including important parcels on the Grand Cru sites of Eichberg and Pfersigberg and they also buy in grapes under négociant contract. The wine-making is overseen by current patron Marc Beyer who produces wines that have a great expression of varietal character and are (with the exception of specific sweet bottlings) notably drier than those made by most other 'Grandes Maisons'. They make a fine foil to the celebrated specialities of Alsace, such as choucroute and baeckeoffe, and also spicy Asiatic soups, salads and stir-frys. Their Pinot Blanc is light and fruity and makes a versatile aperitif while the Pinot Gris has more depth and some subtle white pepper notes. Marc's fragrant dry Muscat is redolent of orange blossom and ripe table grapes and rich, spicy Gewürztraminer has an unctuous texture and persistent finish. The Riesling exhibits classic kerosene and lime leaf aromas and has a nervy, mineral-edged palate. The red Pinot Noir has a pale garnet robe and delicate summer berry scents and flavours supported by gentle tannins. An exemplary, bottle-fermented Crémant d'Alsace is made from a blend of Pinot Blanc and Pinot Auxerrois and has a fine mousse and a generous weight of orchard fruit.

Worthy of particular attention are the family's flagship 'Comtes d'Eguisheim' releases that come with magnificently illuminated labels and will support up to 10 years bottle age. The Riesling has complex dried fruit nuances, great length and finesse while the Pinot Noir has a wealth of black cherry and berry characteristics and peppery undertones.

Completing this commendable compendium is a magnificent late-harvested Gewürztraminer: a richly-honeyed, lychee-scented nectar to be sipped reverently as a postprandial treat.

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  1. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'La Cuvée' 2018
    Bottle
    £12.95
    Bottle (Case)
    £155.40
  2. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Pinot Gris 2017
    Bottle
    £17.25
    Bottle (Case)
    £207.00
  3. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Vendange Tardive' Gewürztraminer 2011
    Half Bottle
    £25.00
    Half Bottle (Case)
    £600.00
  4. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Riesling 2018
    Bottle
    £15.95
    Bottle (Case)
    £191.40
  5. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Pinot Blanc 2018
    Bottle
    £13.95
    Bottle (Case)
    £167.40
  6. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Muscat 2015
    Bottle
    £16.50
    Bottle (Case)
    £198.00
  7. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Gewürztraminer 2017
    Bottle
    £17.75
    Bottle (Case)
    £213.00
  8. Alsace: Léon Beyer Crémant d'Alsace Brut
    Bottle
    £17.95
    Bottle (Case)
    £215.40
    Half Bottle
    £12.95
    Half Bottle (Case)
    £310.80
  9. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Comtes d'Eguisheim' Riesling 2011
    Bottle
    £36.75
    Bottle (Case)
    £441.00
  10. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Réserve Personnelle' Pinot Noir 2017
    Bottle
    £17.25
    Bottle (Case)
    £207.00
  11. Alsace: Léon Beyer 'Comtes d'Eguisheim' Pinot Noir 2015
    Bottle
    £36.00
    Bottle (Case)
    £432.00
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Alsace Wine Region

Occupying the key strategic territory between the Vosges mountains and the river Rhine, Alsace has changed hands like a passed parcel over the centuries but has remained officially French since the Potsdam Agreement of 1945. The result of this fluid history is a uniquely Rhine-ish identity that can be seen in its culture, architecture, cuisine and wine. Onions, cabbages, potatoes, pork, eggs, cheese and pastry all loom large in the local culinary repertoire, which is complimented to perfection by a diverse range of highly distinctive and aromatic 'single-varietal' wines.

AOC Alsace was created in 1962 (Cremant followed in 1976) and the region mainly produces white wines - 90% of production. 51 Grand Cru sites were formally recognised in 2011, yet even they deliver remarkable value for money.